MA Third Semester

Course Title: Political Economy of Nepal

Course No.:  MRD 571

Nature of the Course: Theory and Practical                                       Period per Week: 3

Year: Second                                                                                      Time per Period: 1 hour

Semester: Third                                                                                   Total Period: 48

Level: MA

 

Course Objective

This course aims to apply political economic perspectives to development programs experienced over various periods in Nepal. The specific objectives are to a) delineate phases of development b) draw on the development perspectives, Institutions, and policies, and c) evaluate the strength and weakness of the political economic perspectives with respect to the real development outcome.

Contents                                                                                                                                LH

Unit I: Prelude                                                                                                             8

1.1 Overview of Pre-Rana Period

1.2 Rana Period (1846-1950)

1.2.1 Institutions and Policies of Isolationism

1.2.2 Community struggles and Government’s responses

1.3 Democratic Innovation (1950-1960)

1.3.1 First wave of modernization

1.3.2 Policies of future direction

Unit II: Experimentation with Panchayat (1960-1990)                              13

2.1 Land Reform

2.2 Industrialization

2.3 Regional development

2.4 Decentralization: Rhetoric and reality

2.5 National integration, Ethnicity, and Women

2.6 Education

2.7 Foreign aid

Unit III: Turning Points: Open Market Economy (1990-2000)                15

3.1 Liberalization, Privatization and Globalization

3.2 Foreign trade

3.3 Poverty reduction

3.4 Local development

3.5 Information and Communication technology

Unit IV: Inclusive Development (2000- )                                                                 7

4.1 Growth dilemma: What went wrong?

4.2 Unemployment, Inequality and Inclusive Development

4.3 Sharing resources among provinces and people

References

Aditya, A. (1999). Political economy of small states. Kathmandu: FES.

Bista, D. B. (2001).  Fatalism and development, Nepal’s struggle for modernization. Patna: Orient Longman.

Blaikie, P. M., Cameron, J. and Seddon, J. D. (2007). Nepal in Crisis: Growth and stagnation at the periphery. New Delhi: Adroit Publishers.

Bongartz, H. and Dahal, D. (1996). Development studies: Self-help organizations, NGOs and civil society. Kathmandu: FES

Caddel, M. (2002). Education and change: A Historical Perspective on Schooling,

Development and the Nepali Nation-State.                                                          https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/d828/e7e6d8be17623ccfff54aa8a19e95c   e1cbd0.pdf

Dibbya-Upadesh (Celestial advice). http://www.lawcommission.gov.np/en/documents/2015/08/dibbaya-upadesh-of-prithivi-narayan-shah.pdf.

Gurung, H. (1984). Nepal dimensions of development. Kathmandu: Sahayogi Press.

Gyanwaly, R.P. (Ed.) ( 2017). Political Economy of Nepal.     Kathmandu: Central Department of Economics, TU and FES.

Hagen, T. (2012). Decentralization and development; The role of democratic principles. Kathmandu: Ratna Pustak Bhandar

Joshi, B. L. & Rose, L. E. (2007). Democratic innovations in Nepal; A case study of political acculturation. Kathmandu: Mandala Publications.

Khadka, N. (1994). Politics and development in Nepal: Some issues. New Delhi: Nirala Publications.

Koirala, B.P. ( 2014). Democracy indispensable for development (2nd edition). Kathmandu: BP Museum.

Mahat, R.S. (2005). In defense of democracy: dynamics and faults lines of Nepal’s political economy. India: Adroit Publisher.

Mersserschmidt, D. A. (1995).  Development studies: Bibliotheca Himalaya series IV, Vol 1. Kathmandu: EMR Publishing House.

Bhattachan, K. B. and Mishra, M. (Eds.) (2000).  Developmental Practices in Nepal. Kathmandu: Central Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

Mishra, C. (2013). Punjibad ra Nepal (In Nepali). Fine Print:  Kathmandu.

MoF (2017). Economic survey 2017/18. Kathmandu: MoF.

Nepal Human Development Reports 1998, 2004, 2014

Nepal Living Standard Survey Reports

Nepal, K. R. (2013). Samaj, sanskar ra shasan. Kathmandu: InLogas.

NPC (2014). An approach to the graduation from the least developed country by 2022. Kathmandu: National Planning Commission, Nepal.

NPC. (2013). Nepal millennium development goals progress report, 2013. Kathmandu: National Planning Commission, Nepal.

Pande, B. B. (2009). Tyas bakhatko Nepal (Part two, three & four). Kathmandu: Author.

Pandey, D. R. (2009). Nepal’s failed development: Reflections on the mission and the maladies (revised ed.). Kathmandu: Nepal South Asia Centre.

Pradhan, R.P (2005). The Ain of 1854 and after: Legal pluralism,  models of society and ethnicity in Nepal , November 2015 (Paper presented at the conference “Negotiating Ethnicity in Nepal’s Past and Present”, Kathmandu, September 12 – 14, 2005.) DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.2039.7529.

Pyakuryal, B. (2015). Nepal’s development tragedy: Threats and possibilities. Kathmandu: Fine Print.

Regmi, M. C. (1999). An economic history of Nepal, 1768-1846. New Delhi: Adroit Publishers.

Sharma, G. N. (2000). Nepal: Missing elements in the development thinking. New Delhi: Nirala Publications.

Sharma, J. (2006). Nepal : Struggle for existence. Kathmandu: CommInc.

Shrestha, N.R. (1997).  In the name of development: A reflection of Nepal. Kathmandu: Educational Publishing House.

Thapa, K. B. (1995). Social, economic and administrative history of modern Nepal (2nd Edition). Kathmandu: Ratna Pustak Bhandar.

Thapa, K.B., Timilsina, P.  & Dahal, M.K.  (1994). Adhunik Nepalko arthik itihas (In Nepali). Kathmandu: Center for Nepal and South Asian Studies.

The constitution of Nepal 2015. www.nepallawcommission.com. (accessed 2/2/2016).

Treaty between the United Kingdom and Nepal: Together with not respecting the importation of arms and ammunition in to Nepal (1925). London: His Majesty Stationary Office. http://treaties.fco.gov.uk/docs/pdf/1925/TS0031.pdf . (accessed 19/9/2015).

Varioius Periodic Plans (I to XIV)

Various Economic Survey Reports

 

 

Course Title: Tourism and Development

Course No.:  MRD 572

Nature of the Course: Theory                                                             Period per Week: 3

Year: Second                                                                                      Time per Period: 1 hour

Semester: Third                                                                                   Total Period: 48

Level: MA

 

Course Objectives

The general objective of this course is to provide understanding of the concept, issues, policies and practices of tourism with special references of Nepal. It will be helpful to know, analyze and impart the tourism related knowledge in practical basis. Most specifically it will provide the knowledge about rural tourism relating with rural development of Nepal.

Course Contents                                                                                                                 LH

Unit I:  Introduction                                                                                                             15

1.1 Concept and Components of Tourism

1.2 Basic Approaches to Study the Tourism

Institutional, Product, Historical, Managerial, Economic, Sociological, Geographical, Interdisciplinary, The system

1.3 Types of tourism

1.3.1 Mass and alternative tourism

1.3.2 Special interest tourism

1.3.3 Microscale approach

1.3.4 Meso-level accounts of tourism

1.4. Sustainability of tourism

1.5 Impact of tourism with reference to Nepal

Unit II: Tourism Policy and Planning                                                                                 15

2.1 Tourism policy: A definition

2.2 The focus of tourism policy

2.3 Process of tourism policy formulation

2.4 Role of public sector and tourism policy

2.4.1 From governance to governance

2.4.2 Multilevel governance

2.5 Tourism policy of Nepal (more specifically rural tourism policy)

2.6 Introduction of tourism planning

2.7 Changing approaches to destination planning

2.8 Five Approaches of Tourism Planning

2.8.1 Boosterism

2.8.2 An economic, industry oriented approach

2.8.3 A physical/ spatial approach

2.8.4 A community- oriented approach

2.8.5 A sustainable tourism approach

2.9. Tourism planning process

2.10. Need of tourism planning

Unit III: Tourism Marketing                                                                                               9

3.1 Tourism marketing concept

3.2 Tourism market segmentation and tourism marketing mix

3.3 Contemporary tourism marketing approach

3.3.1 Research – driven tourism market information approach

3.3.2 Relationship marketing approach

3.3.3 The use of technology approach

3.3.4 New tourism product development approach

3.3.5 Corporate social responsibility and marketing ethics approach

3.4 Joint Marketing Efforts

Unit IV: Forms of Tourism                                                                                                  9

4.1. Rural tourism

4.1.1 Concept of rural tourism

4.1.2 Rural tourism and community power

4.1.3 Importance of rural tourism

4.1.4 False assumption of rural tourism

4.1.5 Rural Tourism in Nepal

4.2. Agro tourism

4.2.1 Critical success factors of agro tourism

4.2.2 Prospects and challenges of agro tourism

4.2.3 Revitalization of rural economy through agro tourism

4.2.4 Agro-tourism in Nepal

4.3. Eco tourism: Principles, issues and practices

4.3.1 Eco-tourism in Nepal

4.4 Alternative Forms of Tourism

References:

Bhatiya, A. K. (2010). Tourism development principles and practices. New Delhi: Sterling publishers.

Cooper, Chris and C. Michael Half (2013). Contemporary Tourism: An international approach. Oxford: Goodfellow Publisher Ltd.

George, E.W., Mair, H. & Reid, D. G.(2009). Rural tourism development localism and cultural Change. Toronto: Channel View Publication.

Goeldner, C.R & Ritchie, J. R. (2007). Tourism principles, practices, philosophies. New Delhi:  Wiely India.

Hall, D., Kirkpatrick, I. & Mitchell, M. (Ed.) (2005). Rural tourism and sustainable business. Canada: Channel view Publications.

Kharel, S. (2014). Rural tourism in Nepal. Kathmandu: Quest Publication.

Kunwar,  R. R. (2010).Tourists and tourism science and industry interface. Kathmandu: Modern Printing Press.

Pradhanang, S. B. (2009). Village the new tourist destination of Nepal. Kathmandu: Adroid  Publisher.

Upadhyay,  R. P. (2008). Readings in rural tourism. Kathmandu: Sunlight Publication

 

 

Course Title: Sustainable Development

Course No.:  MRD 573

Nature of the Course: Theory                                                             Period per Week: 3

Year: Second                                                                                      Time per Period: 1 hour

Semester: Third                                                                                   Total Period: 48

Level: MA

 

Course Objectives

This course aims to enable students to conceptualize the basic ideas, approaches and strategies of sustainable development. More basically, the course intends to analyze the effect of sustainable development in rural livelihood through the deep understanding of its impact on various resources, climate change adaptation and mitigation measures. After the completion of the course, students are expected to use their knowledge in the field of climate change and sustainable issues of rural development.

Course Contents                                                                                                                 LH

Unit I: Introduction                                                                                                  10

  • Sustainable Development: Concepts and Principles
  • Evolution of Sustainable Development Agenda
  • Livelihood approach to sustainable development
  • Relationship between sustainable development and climate change

Unit II: Measuring Sustainable Development                                                        10

2.1 Principles and approaches to sustainable development measurement

2.2 Key indicators of sustainable development

2.3  Sustainable Development Goals ( SDGs) and its indicators

Unit III: Climate Change Adaptation                                                                     12

3.1 Climate change: Concept, scenario, risk and vulnerability

3.2 Cultural theory: Cultural Risk Theory (CRT) on climate change adaptation

3.3 Behavioural theory: Prospect Theory, mitigation and adaptation to climate change

3.4 Global and national efforts on climate change adaptation

Unit IV: Climate Change and Livelihood Strategies in Nepal                              16

4.1 Concept of  livelihood strategies for adaptation

4.2 Interrelationship between climate change and rural livelihood

4.3 Impact of climate change in agriculture, water resources, human health, bio-diversity and natural disaster s

4.4 Rural livelihood adaptation strategies in Nepal (Case studies of various livelihood strategies adopted by different ethnic groups living in different ecological regions)

 

References

Desonie, Dana (2008). Climate change. Climate: Causes and effects of climate change (p 1-72). New York (NY): Chelsea House

Lafferty, William M. and Oluf Lannghlelle (1999). Sustainable development as concept and norm. In William M. Lafferty and Oluf Lannghlelle (eds.), Towards sustainable development: On the goals of development – and conditions of sustainability (pp 1-29). London: Macmillan Press

Maharjan Keshav Lall and Niraj Prakash Joshi (2013). Climate change, agriculture and livelihood in developing countries. Japan, Springer

National Planning Commission (NPC) (2017): Nepal’s Sustainable Development Goals, Baseline Report, 2017. Kathmandu, Nepal: Government of Nepal, NPC.

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (2004). Measuring sustainable development: Integrated economic, environmental and social frameworks. OECD.

Robinson, John, Mike Bradley, Peter Busby, Denis Connor, Anne Murray, Bruce Sampson and Wayne Soper (2006).  Climate Change and Sustainable Development: Realizing the Opportunity. Ambio, 35 (1), 2-8.

Sharma, Keshav Prasad (2015). Climatic extremities in Nepal. Compendium of Environment Statistics Nepal 2015 (pp 41-46). Kathmandu, Nepal: Central Bureau of Statistics.

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP (2007). Human development report 2007/2008. New York (NY): UNDP

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/transformingourworld/publication

http://www.fao.org/docrep/006/ad682e/ad682e00.htm#Contents

 

Course Title: Gender and Development

Course No.: MRD 574

Nature of the Course: Theory                                                          Period per Week: 3

Year: Second                                                                                   Time per Period: 1 hour

Semester: Third                                                                                Total Period: 48

Level: MA

 

Course Objectives

The course begins with theoretical approaches to gender and development, development theory, and feminist critiques. Then it turns to specific substantive areas of discussion. Such areas of discussion include examining gender and social development from both an analytical and a practical perspective. It explores the historical roots of academic and policy interest in these matters and considers why development and gender matters in the study of rural development. It examines different ways of analysing population and gender relations and the relationship between academic and policy work in this field. It then investigates current thinking and concerns relating to the practice of population and social development and to the promotion of gender equality and women’s empowerment, and describes tools and frameworks to inform policy making and practice in the field.

Course Contents                                                                                                                 LH

Unit I: Concepts and Theoretical Perspectives on Gender and Development                 12

1.1 From women to gender: The development of the field

1.1.1 Sex and gender, gender as social construct, gender study as women study

1.1.2 Gender schema and terminologies in women and gender studies

1.2 Essence of Gender in Development (Why Gender? Why Development?)

1.3 Theorising the Gender into Development thoughts:

1.3.1 Three waves of feminism

1.3.2 Liberalism/modernism versus liberal feminism

1.3.3 Radical left and radical feminism

1.3.4 Marxism, neo-Marxism and Marxist/social feminism

1.3.5 Sustainable development and Eco-feminism

1.3.6 Postmodernism and Multicultural, Global, Postcolonial, postmodern and third-wave Feminism

1.3.7 Care-Focused Feminism

Unit II: Gender Analysis and Its Trends in Gender and Development                           14

2.1 Concepts, Tools and Exercises

2.1.1 Theoretical perspectives for gender analysis concepts and principles

2.1.2 Choosing a gender analysis framework and guideline

2.1.3 Harvard framework for gender analysis

2.1.4 Moser’s triple role and gender needs framework

2.1.5 Kabeer’s social relation framework

2.2 Trends in Gender and Development from WID to GAD and Beyond

2.2.1 Theoretical roots and trajectories of WID, WAD and GAD

2.2.2 Fitting gender into development institutions and practices: Global and Nepalese perspectives

2.2.3 Gender, Institutions and Development

2.2.4 Context of Women’s underrepresentation

 Unit III   Gender Poverty and Inequality and Its Measurements                                    16

3.1 Gender Poverty

3.1.1 Understanding poverty from a gender perspective

3.1.2 Researching Poverty from Gender lenses

3.1.3 Gender Equality, Poverty and Economic Growth

3.1.4 Poverty as gender experience

3.1.5 Gender, labour market and poverty

3.2 Concepts and Measurements of Gender Inequality

3.2.1 Roles, relations and responsibilities (Private vs Public),

3.2.2 Labour markets and product markets

3.2.3 Gender based violence- root to gender inequality

3.2.4 Concepts in measurement of gender equality/inequality: GDI, GII, GEM,

3.2.5 Gender inequality and demographic outcomes

3.2.6 Women agency and social change

Unit IV   Strategies for Gender and Development with Reference to Nepal                   8

4.1 Gender equity, equality and women’s empowerment- Nepalese practices

4.2 Gender mainstreaming: Nepalese practices

4.3 Gender aware policies and planning

4.4 Gender Auditing, budgeting/financing: Rationale, definitions, elements and tools

References:

Unit I: Readings

Beasley, Chris (2005). Introduction: Gender & Sexuality: Critical Theories, Critical Thinkers, SAGE Publications.

  1. Patricia Connelly, Tania Murray Li, Martha MacDonald, and Jane L. Parpart (2000). Feminism and Development: Theoretical Perspectives (Chapter 3), in Jane L. Parpart, M. Patricia Connelly, and V. Eudine Barriteau (eds.) Theoretical Perspective on Gender and Development. International Development Research Centre (IDRC) PO Box 8500, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Martin, C.L and L.M. Dinella (2001). Gender Development: Gender Schema Theory, in Worell, Judith (ed.), Encyclopedia of Women and Gender. Academic Press.

Reddock, Rhoda. (2000). Why Gender? Why Development? (Chapter 2) in Jane L. Parpart, M. Patricia Connelly, and V. Eudine Barriteau (eds.) Theoretical Perspective on Gender and Development. International Development Research Centre (IDRC) PO Box 8500, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy (2011). Feminist Perspectives on Sex and Gender (First published Mon May 12, 2008; substantive revision Mon Nov 21, 2011)

 

Unit II: Readings

Asian Development Bank. (2010). Overview of Gender Equality and Social Inclusion in Nepal. Asian Development Bank.

Candida March, Ines Smyth, and Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay (1999). A Guide to Gender- Analysis Frameworks. Oxfam GB.

Drechsler, Denis, Johannes Jütting and Carina Lindberg. (2008). Gender, Institutions and Development: Better data, better policies, in Dag Ehrenpreis (ed.), Poverty in Focus: Gender Equality. International Poverty Centre, Number 13, January 2008.

Lewis, Stephen (2005). Women, Half the World, Barely Represented (Chapter 4), in Race against Time. www.aidsfreeworld.org › Our Issues › Women’s Rights.

Moser, Caroline O.N. (1998). Gender Planning in the Third World: Meeting Practical and Strategic Gender Needs. World Development, Vol. 17, No. 11. pp. 1799-1855.

Pradhan, Bina (2006). Gender and Human Development in Nepal, in Sriram Raj pande, S. Tropp, B. Sharma and Y.R. Khatiwada (eds.) Nepal: Readings in Human Development. Kathmandu: UNDP.

Razavi, S. (1997).  Fitting Gender into Development Institutions. World Development, Vol. 25, No. 7, pp. 1111-1125.

Razavi, S. and C. Miller (1995). From WID to GAD: Conceptual Shifts in the Women and Development Discourse.

Unit III: Readings

Asian Development Bank (2010). Overview of Gender Equality and Social Inclusion in Nepal. Asian Development Bank.

Bardhan, Kalpana and Stephan, Klasen (1999). UNDP’s Gender-Related Indices: A Critical Review, World Development, Vol. 27, No. 6, pp. 985-1010.

Bhattacharya, Prabir C. (2006). Economic Development, Gender Inequality, and Demographic Outcomes: Evidence from India. Population and Development Review, Vol. 32, No. 2, pp. 263–291.

Chant, Sylvia (2003). New contributions to the analysis of poverty: methodological and conceptual challenges to understanding poverty from a gender perspective.

Kabeer, Naila (2008). Gender, Labour Markets and Poverty: An overview, in Dag Ehrenpreis (ed.), Poverty in Focus: Gender Equality. International Poverty Centre, Number 13, January 2008.

Morison, A., D. Raju and N. Sinha (2007). Gender Equality, Poverty and Economic Growth. The World Bank: Gender and Development Group, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network.

Sen, Amartya (2000). Women’s Agency and Social Change (Chapter 8), in Development as Freedom: Oxford University Press.

Sen, Gita (2008). Poverty as a Gendered Experience: The policy implications, in Dag Ehrenpreis (ed.), Poverty in Focus: Gender Equality. International Poverty Centre, Number 13, January 2008.

Summary of Current Theories Explaining Domestic Violence (institutefornativejustice.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/…/dvtheories.doc)

Theories used to explain male violence against women partners and ex-partners (www.scotland.gov.uk/resource/doc/925/0063072.pdf).

Unit III: Readings

Asian Development Bank (2010). Overview of Gender Equality and Social Inclusion in Nepal. Asian Development Bank.

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Holvoet, Nathalie (2006). Gender Budgeting: its Usefulness in Programme-based Approaches to Aid. Institute of Development Policy and Management, University of Antwerp.

Kabeer, N (1994). Gender-aware policy and planning: A social-relations perspective. Oxfam: Oxford.

Pradhan, Bina (2006). Gender and Human Development in Nepal, in Sriram Raj pande, S. Tropp, B. Sharma and Y.R. Khatiwada (eds.) Nepal: Readings in Human Development. Kathmandu: UNDP.

Seguino, Stephanie (2013). Financing for Gender Equality: Reframing and Prioritizing Public Expenditures to Promote Gender Equality, UN Women.

Sharp, Rhonda, Diane Elson, Monica Costa and Sanjugta Vas Dev (2009). Gender Responsive Budgeting in the Asia Pacific Region: the Case of Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Title: Research Methodology

Course No.: MRD 575

Nature of the Course: Theory                                                          Period per Week: 3

Year: Second                                                                                   Time per Period: 1 hour

Semester: Third                                                                                Total Period: 48

Level: MA

 

Course Objectives

Rural development is a multidisciplinary discipline that requires knowledge about different social phenomenon and relationships. The rural development practitioners have to dig out those social relationships with the help of social science research. In this regard, the course is aimed to acquaint the students with the knowledge, technique and process of social science research, preparation of research as well as development project proposals. It aims to help students to be an independent researcher in rural development issues by making them capable of following the process of scientific inquiry in rural development issues.

Course Contents                                                                                                                 LH

Unit I: Conceptual Understanding of Research Methodology                                         14

1.1 Difference between Method and Methodology

1.2 Difference between Quantitative and Qualitative Research and its Triangulation

1.3 Research Process in Quantitative Research Method

1.4 Research Process in Qualitative Research Method

1.5 Ethical Issues and Plagiarism in Research

Unit II: Research Design                                                                                                      10

2.1 Philosophy of Research

2.2 Measurement Theory

2.3 Major Quantitative Research Designs

2.4 Major Qualitative Research Designs

2.5 Reliability and Validity

Unit III: Data Collection and Analysis                                                                                16

3.1 Primary and Secondary Sources of Data

3.2 Probability and Non-Probability Sampling Techniques

3.3 Quantitative Techniques and Tools

3.4 Qualitative Techniques and Tools

Unit IV: Scientific Research Writing                                                                                  8

4.1. Types of Writings

4.2. Exploring Research Issues in Rural Development

4.3. Writing a Proposal

4.4. Organization of the Research Writing

4.5 Presentation of Research Writing

References

Babbie, E.R. (2010). The practice of social research (12th ed.). New York: Wadsworth.

Bailey, K.D. (1994). Methods of social research (Fourth ed.). New York: The Free Press.

Baker, T.L. (1999). Doing social research (Third Ed.). New York: McGraw Hill Higher Education.

Baskota, S. (2004). Research methodology. Kathmandu: New Hira Books.

Black, T.R. (2002). Understanding social science research. London: Sage Publication.

Blacok, H.M. (1980). Sociological theory and research: A critical appraisal. New York: Collier Macmillan Publishing.

Creswell, J.H. (2007). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among the five approaches. New Delhi: Sage Publication.

Denzin, N. K. and Y. Lincoln (eds.) (2005). The sage handbook of qualitative research (Third edition). USA: Thousand Oak, Sage Publication.

Kerlinger, F.N. (2000). Foundation of behavioural research. New Delhi: Surjeet Publication

Khatri, B.B. (2012). Research and statistics in education. Kathmandu: Kriti Publication

Kothari, C.R. (2004). Research methodology: Methods and techniques. New Delhi: New Age International Publishers.

Nachmais, C. F. and D, Nachmais (1996). Research methods in the social sciences. New York: St. Martin’s Press

Neuman, W. Lawrence (2006). Social research methods: qualitative and quantitative approaches (sixth edition). India: Dorling Kindersley Pvt. Ltd.

Panta. P.R. (2012). Social science research and thesis writing. Kathmandu: Buddha Publication.

Punch, K.F. (2005). Introduction to social research: quantitative and qualitative approaches. London: Sage Publications.

Sharma, P. (2003). A handbook of social science research methodology. Kathmandu: Kshitiz Prakashan.

Sharma, P. and Wicken, J. (2003). Social science research methods in practical use. Kathmandu: Kshitiz Prakashan.

Subedi, P.K. (2012). Foundation of scientific research. Kathmandu: Ratna Pustak Bhandar

Subedi, P.K. (2010). Social research methods. Kathmandu: Kirti Publication

Walliman. N, (2006). Social research methods. London: Sage Publication.

Wikinson, T.S. and Bhandarkar, P.L. (1979). Methodology and techniques of social research. Mumbai: Himalayan Publishing House.

Young, P.V. (2009). Scientific social survey and research(Fourth Ed.). New Delhi: Prentice Hall.

 

Course Title: Population, Migration and Remittance

Course No.:  MRD 581

Nature of the Course: Theory                                                             Period per Week: 3

Year: Second                                                                                      Time per Period: 1 hour

Semester: Third                                                                                   Total Period: 48

Level: MA

 

Course Objectives

The objective of this course is to enhance knowledge of students on population and its interrelationship with migration and remittance. The topics are as follows:

Course Contents                                                                                                                 LH

Unit I: Fertility, Mortality and Development                                                                      15

1.1 Population as a development issue

1.2 Fertility, culture and development

1.3 Mortality, disease and development

Unit II: Migration and Development                                                                                   10

2.1 Conceptualizing migration

2.2 Relevant theories of migration

2.3 Migration and development linkage

2.4 World migration report 2018

Unit III: Migration and Remittances                                                                                   15

4.1 Remittances and conceptual Issues

4.2 Determinants of migrant remittances

4.3 Role of remittances in rural development

4.4 Trends in migration and remittances

Unit IV: Migration and Remittances Interrelationship in Nepalese Context                  8

3.1 Migration trends and patterns in Nepal

3.2 Labour migration and remittances in Nepal

3.3 Remittances trends in Nepal

References

Gould, W.T.S. (2009). Population and development. UK: Routledge

Ellis, Frank (2003). A livelihoods approach to migration and poverty reduction, Paper Commissioned by the Department for International Development (DFID), Contract No.: CNTR 03 4890. The United Kingdom: University of East Anglia.

International Organization for Migration (IOM) (2018). World migration report 2018: Switzerland: IOM

Kathiwada, P.P (2014). International Migration and Citizenship in Nepal. Population Monograph of Nepal, (VOL. I, p 211-283). Kathmandu, Nepal: Central Bureau of Statistics.

Suwal, B. (2014). Internal Migration in Nepal. Population Monograph of Nepal, (VOL. I, p 241-239). Kathmandu, Nepal: Central Bureau of Statistics.

Massey, Douglas S., Joaquin Arango, Graeme Hugo, Ali Kouaouci, Adela Pellegrino and J. Edward Taylor (1994). An evaluation of international migration theory. Population and Development Review, 20 (4), 699-751.

Ravenstein, E.G. (1889). The Laws of Migration. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, 52, 241-305.

Todaro, Michael P. (1997). Internal migration in developing countries: A review of theory, evidence, methodology and research priorities. Geneva: International Labour Organization.

United Nations (1990). Convention on the protection of the rights of all migrant workers and members of their families (CMW). New York: United Nations.

United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2017). International Migration Report 2017: Highlights (ST/ESA/SER.A/404).