PhD Second Semester

Course Title: Academic Writing                                            Credit hours: 1.5

Course Code: AW758                                                             Teaching hours: 24

Level: Doctor of Philosophy

 

Objective of the course

 

This course has been developed for the second semester Ph. D. students enrolled to various programs under Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.The course will be conducted by the Dean’s Office during the first half of the second semester. The major objective of the course is to enhance student’s knowledge and skills at academic writing and help them write research articles and reports. During the course, students will write one research article which will be finalized during the second half of the second semesterconducted by the central departments.

 

Method of Evaluation

Evaluation of article will be as per the Ph.D.ProgrammeKaryabidhi, 2074, Tribhuvan University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

UnitI: Introduction to Academic Writing and Research

 

  • Defining and understanding academic writing
  • Academic Writing as a part of Research and Science
  • Features of Science and Research in Academic Writing
  • Types of Academic Writing
  • Importance of Good Academic Writing in Various Academic Works

 

Unit II: Kinds of Academic Writing

 

  • The Challenge of Writing
  • Different Kinds of Writing
  • Journalistic Writing
  • Creative Writing
  • Academic Writing
  • The Role of Grammar and Usage

 

Unit III: Writing Process

 

  • Background to Writing
  • Avoiding Plagiarism
  • From Titles to Outlines
  • Evaluating Texts
  • Selecting Key Points, Note-making, ParaphrasingSummary Writing
  • Combining Sources, Organising Paragraphs, Organising the Main Body, Introductions, Conclusions
  • Rewriting and Proof-reading

 

 

Unit IV:  Elements of Writing and Making a Claim

 

Argument, Assembling Reasons and Evidence

Cohesion, Comparison, Definitions, Discussion, Examples, Generalisations, Numbers, Opening Paragraphs, Acknowledgement, References and Quotations, Restatement and Repetition

Style, Synonyms, Variation in Sentence Length, Visual Information

 

UnitV: Accuracy in Writing

 

Abbreviations, Academic Vocabulary, Adverbs, Articles, Caution, Confusing Pairs, ConjunctionsNationality Language, Nouns and Adjectives, Nouns – Countable and Uncountable, Nouns – Umbrella, Prefixes and Suffixes, Prepositions, Punctuation, Relative Pronouns, Singular or Plural?, Time Words and Phrases, Verbs and Tenses.

 

 

Readings:

 

Mathukutty M. M. and Pawar, B.S. (2010). Academic writing: A guide for management students and researchers, New Delhi: Response Books, (from SAGE Publication).

Murray, R.&Moore, S.(2006). The handbook of academic writing: A fresh approach, Berkshire,:Open University Press, McGraw-Hill Education.

Bailey, S. (2006).Academic writing: A handbook for international students, Second edition, New York: Routledge.

Guba, E. G., & Lincoln, Y. S. (1994). Competing paradigms in qualitative research. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of qualitative research (pp. 105-117). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Kemeny, J.G. (1959). A philosopher looks at science, New York: D.VanNostrandComapany

Kerlinger, F.N. (1964). Foundations of behavioural research, New York: Holt Rinehart and Winston.

Silverman, D. (2013). Doing qualitative research, London: Sage.

 

Course Title:    Philosophical Foundation of Social Science ResearchCredit hours: 3

Course Code: RPH771                                                                       Teaching hours:  48

Level: Doctor of Philosophy

 

Objectives of the Course

This course is designed for the course-based Ph. D. programme of Tribhuvan University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. The main objective of this course is to strengthen the students’ understanding of philosophical foundations ofhumanities and social science research. More specifically, this course will enable students to envision research issues through a particular disciplinary philosophical lens and accordingly take guidance in choosing appropriate research strategies. This course provides students with necessary knowledge of disciplinary episteme and encourages them to apply the knowledge and skills gained from the course to the entire work specified in the Seminar on Research Design (SRD772) course.

 

Assessment Methods and Types

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Attendance                                                                  10%

Participation                                                                10%

Presentation                                                                20%

Class examination

First exam (after 3rd Unit)                               20%

Second exam (after 6th Unit)                          20%

Use of research philosophy in research

proposaldeveloped during SRD772 course    20%

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Total                                                                            100%

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Disciplinary Codes:

  1. Come to class in time. You may not be permitted to enter class, if you are late.
  2. Use of cell phone is strictly prohibited during class. Laptop can be used for the presentation purpose or with the permission of the Instructors.
  3. Students are required to be respectful with each other.
  4. Should come with precis of the reading to be discussed.

 

Details of Contents

 

Unit I: Aim of Social Science Research                                                                 3 hrs

  • Overview on Concept and Definition of Research
  • Overview on Research Methodology and Methods
  • Aim of Social Scienceand Social Science Research: Description, Explanation, Prediction

 

Key Readings:

Leedy, P. D. and Ormrod, J. E. (1993). What is Research? (Part One: The Fundamentals), Practical Research: Planning and Design (Ninth Edition). Boston: Published by Pearson Education, Inc.

Mukherji,  P. N. (2000). Introduction: Methodology in Social Research: Dilemmas and Perspectives, In P. N. Mukharji(ed.), Methodology in Social Research Dilemmas and Perspectives. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

 

Unit II: Philosophical Foundation of Social Science Research                          12 hrs

  • Relationship between Ontology (Objectivism,Subjectivism), Epistemology (Positivism-Scientific, Post-modernism (Interpretivism), Critical Theory), Methodology (Deductive, Inductive, Abductive),Methods (Quantitative, Qualitative, Mixed) and

Sources (Survey and Interview Transcripts)

 

Key Readings:

Bhaskar, R. (2008). A Realist Theory of Science (Introduction). New York: Routledge.

Grix, J. (2002). Introducing Students to the Generic Terminology of Social Research. Politics: 2002 Vol. 22(3), 175–186.

Guba, E. G., & Lincoln, Y. S. (1994). Competing paradigms in qualitative research. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of qualitative research (pp. 105-117). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Holden, M. T. and Lynch, P. (n.d.). Choosing the Appropriate Methodology: Understanding Research Philosophy. Cork Road, Waterford: Waterford Institute of Technology.

Kemeny, J. G. (1959). A Philosopher Looks At Science (The Method – Chapter 5). New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.

Lemons, N., (2007). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge (page 1-13). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Mukherji,  P. N. (2000). Introduction: Methodology in Social Research: Dilemmas and Perspectives, In P. N. Mukharji(ed.), Methodology in Social Research Dilemmas and Perspectives. New Delhi: Sage Publications.

Oppong, S.  (2014). A Critique of the Philosophical Underpinnings of Mainstream Social Science Research. Ghana : African University College of Communication & University of Ghana. Retrieved from  http://www.academicus.edu.al/nr10/Academicus-MMXIV-10-242-254.pdf

Searle, J. R. (2006). Social Ontology: Some Basic Principles. Papers 80, 51-71. Berkeley: University of California.

 

 Unit III: Science and Scientific Method                                                                 10 hrs

  • Naïve science, Pseudo-science, True science
  • Characteristics of Science
  • Methods of Scientific Explanation (Scientific methods): Research questions, Hypotheses, Experimentation/Observation, Reasoning
  • Scientific Explanation:Good Explanation, Bad Explanation, Incomplete Explanation
  • Explanation and Prediction, Hierarchy of Explanation
  • The Role of “Purpose” in Explanation

 

Key Readings:

Babbie, E. (1990). Survey Research Methods (The Logic of Science). Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Bhatacherjee, A. (2012). Social Science Research: Principles, Methods, and Practices (Chapter 1 and 2). USF Tampa Bay Open Access Textbooks Collection. Book 3.

Kemeny, J. G. (1959). A Philosopher Looks At Science (Chapter 9. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.

Kemeny, J. G. (1959). A Philosopher Looks At Science What is Science (Chapter10). New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.

Kerlinger, F. N. (1964). Foundations of Behavioural Research (Chapter 1, 2 and 3). New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.

Thorlindsson, T.  andVilhjalmsson, R. (2003). Introduction to the Special  Issue: Science, Knowledge  and Society.  ACTA  SOCIOLOG. Iceland: University of Iceland.

 

Unit IV: Causation and Research Design                                                              10 hrs

  • Law, Theory, and Model
  • Overview on Main Assumptions and Arguments of Selected Social Theories (functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interactionalism, system theory, feminist theories, change theories)
  • Causation and Research Design
  • Criterion of causation

Nomothetic casual explanation

Idiographic casual explanation

 

Readings:

Bachman, R. and Schutt, R. K. (2003). The Practice of Research in Criminology and Criminal Justice (Casuation and Research Design-Chapter 5). Retrieved from http://social.cs.uiuc.edu/class/cs598kgk-04/papers/Causation-Research-Design.pdf

Bhatacherjee, A. (2012). Social Science Research: Principles, Methods, and Practices (Chapter 2, Theories and Models). USF Tampa Bay Open Access Textbooks Collection. Book 3.

Bronowski, J. (n.d.). The Common Sense of Science (Chapter Five). New York: Vintage Books.

Carter, M. J. and Fuller, C. (2015). Symbolic interactionism. Sociopedia.isa, DOI: 10.1177/205684601561, California State University, Northridge, USA

Coser, L. A. (1957). Social Conflict and the Theory of Social Change. The British Journal of Sociology, Vol. 8, No. 3. (Sep., 1957), pp. 197-207.

Friedman, B. D. and Allen, K. M. (2014). Systems Theory. Retrived from:  file:///C:/Users/personal/Downloads/friedmanallenchapter12ned.pdf

Hulswit, M. (n.d.) A Short History of Casuation, The Netherlands: University of Nijmegen.

Intriligator, M. D. (1982). Research on Conflict Theory: Analytic Approaches and Areas of Application. The Journal of Conflict Resolution, Vol. 26, No. 2, pp. 307-327.

Mayne, J. (2015). Useful Theory of Change Models. file:///C:/Users/personal/Downloads/Mayne15-UsefulToCs.pdf

Sarikakis, K.  Rush, R. R., Grubb-Swetnam, A. and Lane, C. (2011). Feminist Theory and Research. Retrived from: https://homepage.univie.ac.at/katharine.sarikakis/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Feminist-Theory-and-Research1.pdf

Sato ,T. (2011). Functionalism Itsaxiomatics. Sociopedia.isa, DOI: 10.1177/205684601332, University of Tokyo.

 

Additional Readings:

Steel, D. (n. d.). Casualty, Casual Models, and Social Mechanism, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University.

Taylor, R. (1992). Freedom and Determinism. Retrieved from https://faculty.unlv.edu/jwood/unlv/Articles/TaylorFreeWill.PDF

Michael, L. (n.d.). Determinism. Retrieved from http://documents.routledge-interactive.s3.amazonaws.com/9781138793934/AS/Freewill/Determinism.pdf

 

Unit V: Validity and Reliability                                                                                8 hrs

  • Defining validity
  • Triangulation
  • Ensuring validity
  • Reliability in quantitative research
  • Reliability in qualitative research
  • Validity and reliability in interviews: Validity and reliability in experiments, Validity and reliability in questionnaires, Validity and reliability in observations, Validity and reliability in tests, Validity and reliability in life histories

 

Key Readings:

Cohen, L., Manion, L., and Morrison, K. (2007). Research Methods in Education (Chapter 6). London and New York: Routledge.

 

Carmines, E. G. and Zeller, R. A. (1987). Reliability and Validity Assessment. In J.  L. Sullivan and R. G. Niemi (Eds.), Quantitative Applications in Social Sciences, Series: Number 07-017. Beverely Hills/London: Sage Publications.

 

Additional readings:

Drost, E. A. (2011). Validity and Reliability in Social Science Research. Education Research and Perspectives, Vol.38, No.1. Retrived from http://www.erpjournal.net/ wp-content/uploads/2012/07/ERPV38-1.-Drost-E.-2011.-Validity-and-Reliability-in-Social-Science-Research.pdf

 

Unit VI: Research Ethics                                                                                          5hrs

  • Introduction
  • Informed Consent
  • Access and Acceptance
  • The Field of Ethics
  • Sources of Tension
  • Voices of Experience
  • Ethical Dilemmas
  • Ethics and Research Methods in Education
  • Ethics and Evaluative Research
  • Research and Regulation: Ethical Codes and Review
  • Sponsored Research
  • Responsibilities to the Research Community
  • Institutional Review Board (IRB)
  • Getting Ethnical Clearance in Nepal

 

Key Readings:

Cohen, L., Manion, L., and Morrison, K. (2007). Research Methods in Education (Chapter 2). London and New York: Routledge.

Babbie, E. (1990). Survey Research Methods (Chapter 19), Wadsworth Publishing Company.

 

Course Title: Seminar on Research Design                                             Credit hours 1.5

Course code:SRD772                                                                                   Teaching hours 24

Level:Doctor of Philosophy

 

Objective of the course

 

This course is developed for the second semester Ph. D. students of Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. This course will be conducted by the Dean’s Office in first half of the second semester. Thecourse consists ofthree interrelated sections, which are intended to help students develop their research proposal and research methodology. Designed as a research practicum component, the course allows students to develop full-fledged research design based on their preliminary conceptualization of the issue or area under investigation. During the course, students will prepare a research proposal on areas of their interest which will be finalized and presented during the second half of the semester conducted by the central departments.

 

Assessment Methods and Types

————————————————————————————-

Attendance and participation                                                  10%

Preparation of term paper with topic, review

and research gap and problem statement                              20%

Preparation of term paper with research design,

data collection tools and techniques including

previous section                                                                      20%

Preparation and submission of draft proposal                        20%

Presentation and viva voce                                                    30%

—————————————————————————————

Total                                                                                        100%

—————————————————————————————

 

Disciplinary Codes:

  1. Come to class in time. You may not be permitted to enter class, if you are late.
  2. Use of cell phone is strictly prohibited during class. Laptop can be used for the presentation purpose or with the permission of the Instructors.
  3. Students are required to be respectful each other.
  4. Should come with precis of the reading to be discussed.

 

Unit I: Overview on research proposal format

  • Selection of Title
  • Background

 

Unit II. Literature, problem identification and relevant theories

  • Literature review in research preparation
  • Role and purpose of literature review
  • Literature review as foundation and inspiration
  • Looking ahead over common concerns of literature review
  • Literature review as foundation to problem identification and exploration of relevant theories for doctoral research works
  • Theoretical framework in dissertation research: Understanding, selection and integration

 

Unit III: Research problem, research design and Research tool development

  • Selection of research approach
  • Philosophical worldviews and development of research problem and research questions
  • Research design: quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods
  • Use of theory: quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods
  • Research methods and tools development
  • Research problem and selection of relevant tools
  • Ethical issues in field method design and implementation

 

Unit IV: Data collection/generation, analytical approaches and interpretation

  • Collecting and generating adequate and appropriate data
  • Worldviews, theories and analytical approaches reconsidered
  • Interpreting qualitative and quantitative data in answering research questions (report writing)
  • Academic document as a story

 

Unit V: Referencing

 

Readings:

 

Boote, David N and Beile, Penny (2005).Scholars before researchers:On the centrality of the dissertation literature review in research preparation, Educational Researcher, Vol. 34, No. 6, pp. 3–15

Creswell, JW (2014). Research Design: Qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches. New Delhi: Sage.

Edmonds, W. Alex & Kennedy, Thomas D, (2017).An Applied Guideto Research Designs: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Methods (Second edition), New Delhi: Sage.

Grant, C. and Osanloo A. (2014). Understanding, selecting, and integrating atheoretical framework in dissertation research: Creating the blueprint for your “house,” Administrative issues Journal: Connecting education, practice and research. volume 4 issue 2, pp. 12-26. DOI: 10.5929/2014.4.2.9.

Leavy, Patricia (2017). Research Design: Quantitative,Qualitative, Mixed Methods,Arts-Based, and Community-BasedParticipatory Research Approaches. New York: The Guilford Press.

 

Note:

As suggested by some experts, course tile should be revised as “Research Practicum” or “Research Method, Research Design, and Data Analysis”.

 

You can suggest more appropriate title.